Feed Me, Seymour

In the Broadway play and film “Little Shop of Horrors” there’s a plant named Audrey II that has a voracious appetite and must be fed a steady diet [of blood]. This comic rock horror musical featured Rick Moranis and Steve Martin in the movie, but the biggest star may have been the plant himself. The line most remembered is when Audrey II continues to implore his owner, “Feed me, Seymour!”

I think of the Internet as a kind of Audrey II. Like the plant, the Internet has a pressing need for content. Our job is to keep feeding it. What we feed it, and how, was the subject of a great presentation I heard last week, “The Path to Member Engagement: Consistently Delivering Highly Valued Content,” expertly presented by Doug Klegon, Principal at Klegon Strategic Communications. This presentation was hosted by the Association Forum’s¬†Shared Interest Groups (SIGs), the Marketing SIG and the IT SIG.

Mr. Klegon’s presentation was geared to association professionals whose main audience is their members. But the principles he shared can apply to anyone who is responsible for continually providing valued content to an Internet website, a blog, or even to social media outlets like LinkedIn and Twitter. Lesson #1, he said, is that content strategy is critical to delivering member (read: client) value. He said it’s crucial to plan for useful, usable content that is, most importantly, easily retrievable.¬†I leave it to the IT geniuses to work out the back-shop mechanics of making content easily retrievable. My focus in on developing valuable content and reinforcing the connection between content and strategy, both for my clients and for my own efforts as a business owner.

“Content strategy is change management in disguise,” said Hilary Marsh, another Association Forum member, during the presentation which was graciously hosted by the Association Management Center. Ms. Marsh is president and chief content and digital strategist at Content Company, a firm providing consultation on web, mobile, social media and e-communications. Mr. Klegon loved Ms. Marsh’s line so much that he nimbly incorporated it as his own later in his presentation, providing a good laugh for his audience. Both were saying the same thing: a content strategy begins and ends with an organization’s strategic plan.

Like that insatiable plant in “Little Shop of Horrors,” the Internet demands content. What we feed it and why is up to us. Having a plan in place that aligns with our mission, our vision, our values and our audience is critical before we go lobbing stories and articles onto the web. Without that discernment, like Seymour, we risk being eaten alive.

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